According to findings from a Korean study published in Scientific Reports, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at higher risk for hyperuricemia if they have anemia. That association was not fully explained by declining renal function.

Jaejoon Lee, MD, Seoul-based Samsung Medical Center, and associates analyzed the association between anemia and hyperuricemia in 10,794 adults from the 2016–2017 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey, of whom 1302 (12.1%) had hyperuricemia and 9,494 (87.9%) did not have hyperuricemia.n the CKD group, the prevalence of anemia was higher in the patients with than without hyperuricemia (43.2% vs 28.6%).

Dr. Lee’s team reported, Among individuals with CKD, the presence of anemia, compared with its absence, was significantly associated with a 2.3-fold increased odds of hyperuricemia after adjusting for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), diabetes, hypertension, demographics, body mass index, smoking, alcohol, and physical activity. In the non-CKD group, the presence of anemia was significantly associated with 32% decreased odds of hyperuricemia after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, education level, and income.

“The results of this study showed that anemia and hyperuricemia are inversely correlated in non-CKD subjects, contrary to that in chronic kidney disease subjects,” the authors of the Korean study wrote. “This may reflect nutritional status. In hyperuricemic subjects, higher energy intake, higher BMI, and higher obesity prevalence than non-hyperuricemia subjects appear to indicate that hyperuricemic subjects had better nutrition than non-hyperuricemia subjects.”

Anemia was associated more strongly with hyperuricemia in patients 65 years of age or older, and those with hypertension or diabetes, irrespective of chronic kidney disease status. According to the authors, there may be a direct relation between anemia and hyperuricemia in patients with CKD.